Under the Jakfruit Tree January 3, 2019

Sapodilla

I hope everyone had a good Holiday! 
Now we can settle down to normal. 
We are presently harvesting Jujube, 
Sapodilla, Carambola and some Chinese cabbage. 
The weather has been unusually warm for this time of year which has caused normally dormant trees and plants to slow down growth wise. 
Plants however are growing nicely. 
We have a good assortment of herbs for sale. 
I continually get calls regularly for citrus trees. Because of Citrus Greening which is a fatal and incurable disease we do not recommend nor sell citrus trees. In addition almost all citrus trees are grown in North Florida in quarantine on a root stock not suitable to our alkaline South Florida soil. The result is that the fruit tends to be pithy and not sweet. 
That’s 
all from under the Jakfruit tree, until next time. 
In the mean time we ask that you like us on Face Book and Yelp. 

Richard. 

From Under the Jakfruit Tree

This week we harvested two large bunches of  bananas, one is called ‘burro’ used primarily for cooking and the other for eating out of hand. We have many more available for  sale. Each bunch had more than 10 hands, very nice.  Both plants and fruit are available for sale.

Since our South Florida soil is so very nutrient poor we plant our banana pants in deep mounds of old decayed mulch. This medium is extremely nutrient rich. We find it is not necessary to add additional fertilizer, just provide water.  No pesticides or fungicides are required.

 

The sweet almond bushes, Aloysia virgata, are intoxicating.  What a delightful aroma.  The scent can be enjoyed from several feet away.  This bush blooms year round and is extremely maintenance free.

If you enjoy fragrance, stop by and enjoy the strong vanilla scent of the Ceiba schottii tree (Vanilla Kapok).  Our specimen tree is currently in bloom and it blooms for many months out of the year.

That is all for today, from ‘Under the Jakfruit tree‘. 

Under The Jakfruit Tree

Jakfruit

Jakfruit

Here at Richard Lyons Nursery we are at the beginning of the dry season. The weeds are different from the wet season and the dry season fruits are nearing harvest. We have already picked some jujube and sapodilla. Many more are on the way. All the fresh fruit and fruit trees are available for purchase six days a week. We are closed only on Thursdays.

The Brazilian Red Cloak is stunning with its one foot plus plumes of red flowers.

Winter vegetables are growing in the surrounding farms. The humidity is lower and the night temperatures are mostly in the 70s. I saw my first hummingbird of the season sipping nectar from the red firespike plant. More will be here shortly for our winter/dry season. If you plant the right nectar plants, they will come to your yard too.

From under the jackfruit tree.

Richard